Friday Filosophy v.01.14.2022

Friday Filosophy v.01.14.2022

Ray Douglas Bradbury: August 22, 1920 – June 5, 2012) was an American author and screenwriter. One of the most celebrated 20th-century American writers, he worked in a variety of modes, including fantasyscience fictionhorrormystery, and realistic fiction. Bradbury was mainly known for his novel Fahrenheit 451 (1953) and his short-story collections The Martian Chronicles (1950) and The Illustrated Man (1951).[4] Most of his best known work is speculative fiction, but he also worked in other genres, such as the coming of age novel Dandelion Wine (1957) and the fictionalized memoir Green Shadows, White Whale (1992). He also wrote and consulted on screenplays and television scripts, including Moby Dick and It Came from Outer Space. Many of his works were adapted into television and film productions as well as comic books. The New York Times called Bradbury “the writer most responsible for bringing modern science fiction into the literary mainstream.”

Bradbury was born on August 22, 1920, in Waukegan, Illinois, to Esther (née Moberg) Bradbury (1888–1966), a Swedish immigrant, and Leonard Spaulding Bradbury (1890–1957), a power and telephone lineman of English ancestry. He was given the middle name “Douglas” after the actor Douglas Fairbanks.

Bradbury was surrounded by an extended family during his early childhood and formative years in Waukegan. An aunt read him short stories when he was a child.[9] This period provided foundations for both the author and his stories. In Bradbury’s works of fiction, 1920s Waukegan becomes “Green Town”, Illinois.

The Bradbury family lived in Tucson, Arizona, during 1926–1927 and 1932–1933 while their father pursued employment, each time returning to Waukegan. While living in Tucson, Bradbury attended Amphi Junior High School and Roskruge Junior High School. They eventually settled in Los Angeles in 1934 when Bradbury was 14 years old. The family arrived with only US$40 (equivalent to $774 in 2020), which paid for rent and food until his father finally found a job making wire at a cable company for $14 a week (equivalent to $271 in 2020). This meant that they could stay, and Bradbury, who was in love with Hollywood, was ecstatic.]

Bradbury attended Los Angeles High School and was active in the drama club. He often roller-skated through Hollywood in hopes of meeting celebrities. Among the creative and talented people Bradbury met were special-effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen and radio star George Burns. Bradbury’s first pay as a writer, at age 14, was for a joke he sold to George Burns to use on the Burns and Allen radio show.

  • There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.
  • Don’t think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It’s self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can’t try to do things. You simply must do things.
  • Jump, and you will find out how to unfold your wings as you fall.
  • If we listened to our intellect, we’d never have a love affair. We’d never have a friendship. We’d never go into business, because we’d be cynical. Well, that’s nonsense. You’ve got to jump off cliffs all the time and build your wings on the way down.
  • I don’t try to describe the future. I try to prevent it.
  • Stuff your eyes with wonder, live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories.
  • I hate all politics. I don’t like either political party. One should not belong to them – one should be an individual, standing in the middle. Anyone that belongs to a party stops thinking.
  • I know you’ve heard it a thousand times before. But it’s true – hard work pays off. If you want to be good, you have to practice, practice, practice. If you don’t love something, then don’t do it.
  • Science fiction is any idea that occurs in the head and doesn’t exist yet, but soon will, and will change everything for everybody, and nothing will ever be the same again. As soon as you have an idea that changes some small part of the world you are writing science fiction. It is always the art of the possible, never the impossible.
  • Fall in love and stay in love. Write only what you love, and love what you write. The key word is love. You have to get up in the morning and write something you love, something to live for.
  • Every morning I jump out of bed and step on a landmine. The landmine is me. After the explosion, I spend the rest of the day putting the pieces together.

The Time is Now.

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Some Thoughts About 2022

Some Thoughts About 2022

As is pretty normal at this time of year there are many “experts” and “analysts” who provide us with their thinking about the coming year. Interest Rates, Inflation, Unemployment, GDP, labor Participation Rates and so on. Several of these “white papers” have got my attention.

  • Digital Transformation

More than at any previous time we need to move to the “contactless” shopping world. The internet. This is in part due to the ease of use that exists in internet-based shopping. It is simple and easy. How do you stack up against your competitors or the Retail Giants such as Amazon and Walmart? Did you know you can purchase OEM parts from Amazon?

What does your Parts Internet-Based Ordering System look like? What is the pricing policy for on line purchases? How will you handle returns?

  • Fixed versus variable Costs

Following on to the Internet-Based business your price point should not be the same as either telephone or walk in business. Your costs to support the internet business as not as high. The customer becomes a “Co-producer” with you. The telephone selling function for the parts department can be done from home WFH. It can be done on a part time basis. It can be done by people who have retired. Something to think about, isn’t it?

Labor as a service is a becoming trend. Our work force is aging. Retirement at 65 seems to have become a wistful thought. More people are working into their 70’s than ever before. Our technicians are in scarce and very rare supply. There are job functions that can be performed by “labor on demand” staffing. Next week I need to perform one hundred and twenty-four 500-hour maintenance services. I can assign that work to a part time employee. Something to think about, isn’t it?

There are some studies (Ardent Partners) suggesting that “nearly half of the U.S. workforce will be comprised of non-employee and agile talent in 2021.

This changes your cost structure in a major way.

  • Travel Costs are not going to return to Pre-Pandemic levels.

With technology allowing WFH through tools such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom and Skype and others we do not need to “drive” or “fly” to meet with each other. This will require us to re-examine communications. To maintain Company Culture means to be able to continue to be transparent to every employee no matter where they are working, either in a store or in their home. This will provoke a major reduction in costs.

  • The Cost Structure of our Customers.

The pressure on our customers to make money will become more severe than ever before. It is estimated that the cost of operations for Contractors has gone up by 30% (Gary Bartecki in ConstructionPros). In the same article Gary notes that the Average Contactors we asked to provide bids on nonresidential projects. They came in at 13% higher. The contractors have not yet realized the serious nature of the change in their cost structure. This will be turning up in the relationship they have with their dealer suppliers.

This is true at the same time as new equipment is in seriously short supply. Simultaneously Used Equipment prices have increased dramatically at the same time as supply dwindles.

Dealers will be asked to assist their contractor customers at a time with a lot of risk for everyone. This is at a time of serious supply chain challenges, price inflation at its highest level in four decades and skilled labor in scarce supply. This is a tough one and simply the doorway to what is coming at us.

  • Front Line – Customer Facing – Employee Retention

Since October 2021 we have been experiencing the highest level of job separations that we have seen in decades. Employees are changing jobs at a rate in excess of 3% of the workforce. How you work with your critical employees, the ones that I call your “heroes” will make a large difference. Do you truly value these customer facing employees? Do they know it and feel it and see it? Do you ask for their input on issues? Do you give them a voice that they feel is heard? Are they “empowered to make decisions on their own? Are they being compensated at the proper levels? Do you conduct performance reviews with your workers? Is there a career development, a career path, structure in place?

These Five items are but my selection from a much larger list. Each of them has merit. Each of them requires thought and then action. Do you have employees that are available to study these items who have to fit this work into their normal job or do you have employees who are tasked with keeping up with the market changes? We have fallen into a bad habit of expecting too much from each employee. We have overworked the talented people who give us everything they have on a daily basis. That in part is why the separation rate is as high as it is. The temptation to continue to do what you have always done, what Einstein called insanity, is high and very powerful. Most dealership are making more money than they ever have. Business during the Pandemic has actually been pretty good for most dealers. But please remember the old adage – Bulls and Bear make Money. Pigs get fattened and Hogs get slaughtered. Which animal most closely resembles you? Think about it.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.01.07.2022

Friday Filosophy v.01.07.2022

Alexander Graham Bell was born in EdinburghScotland. His family was known for teaching people how to speak English clearly (elocution). Both his grandfather, Alexander Bell, and his father, Alexander Melville Bell, taught elocution. His father wrote often about this and is most known for his invention and writings of Visible Speech.[1] In his writings he explained ways of teaching people who were deaf and unable to speak. It also showed how these people could learn to speak words by watching their lips and reading what other people were saying.

Alexander Graham Bell went to the Royal High School of Edinburgh. He graduated at the age of fifteen. At the age of sixteen, he got a job as a student and teacher of elocution and music in Weston House Academy, at Elgin in Morayshire. He spent the next year at the University of Edinburgh. While still in Scotland, he became more interested in the science of sound (acoustics). He hoped to help his deaf mother. From 1866 to 1867, he was a teacher at Somersetshire College in Bath, Somerset.

In 1870 when he was 23 years old, he moved with his family to Canada where they settled at Brantford, Ontario. Bell began to study communication machines. He made a piano that could be heard far away by using electricity. In 1871 he went with his father to Montreal, Quebec in Canada, where he took a job teaching about “visible speech“. His father was asked to teach about it at a large school for deaf mutes in Boston, Massachusetts, but instead he gave the job to his son. The younger Bell began teaching there in 1872. Alexander Graham Bell soon became famous in the United States for this important work. He published many writings about it in Washington, D.C.. Because of this work, thousands of deaf mutes in the United States of America are now able to speak, even though they cannot hear.

Bell’s genius is seen in part by the eighteen patents granted in his name alone and the twelve that he shared with others. These included fifteen for the telephone and telegraph, four for the photophone, one for the phonograph, five for aeronautics, four for hydrofoils, and two for a selenium cell.

In 1888, he was one of the original members of the National Geographic Society and became its second president.

He was given many honors.

Some of his thoughts and words were very powerful:

  • Before anything else, preparation is the key to success.
  • Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand. The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.
  • Educate the masses, elevate their standard of intelligence, and you will certainly have a successful nation.
  • When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.
  • Great discoveries and improvements invariably involve the cooperation of many minds. I may be given credit for having blazed the trail, but when I look at the subsequent developments, I feel the credit is due to others rather than to myself.
  • America is a country of inventors, and the greatest of inventors are the newspaper men.
  • A man, as a general rule, owes very little to what he is born with – a man is what he makes of himself.
  • A man’s own judgment should be the final appeal in all that relates to himself.
  • My knowledge of electrical subjects was not acquired in a methodical manner but was picked up from such books as I could get hold of and from such experiments as I could make with my own hands.
  • I would impress upon your minds the fact that if you want to do a man justice, you should believe what a man says himself rather than what people say he says.
  • Such a chimerical idea as telegraphing vocal sounds would indeed, to most minds, seem scarcely feasible enough to spend time in working over. I believe, however, that it is feasible and that I have got the cue to the solution of the problem.
  • Morse conquered his electrical difficulties although he was only a painter, and I don’t intend to give in either till all is completed.
  • I do not recognize the right of the public to break in the front door of a man’s private life in order to satisfy the gaze of the curious… I do not think it right to dissect living men even for the advancement of science. So far as I am concerned, I prefer a postmortem examination to vivisection without anesthetics.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.12.31.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.31.2021

Paulo Coelho de Souza; was born in Rio de JaneiroBrazil, and attended a Jesuit school. At 17, Coelho’s parents committed him to a mental institution from which he escaped three times before being released at the age of 20. Coelho later remarked that “It wasn’t that they wanted to hurt me, but they didn’t know what to do… They did not do that to destroy me, they did that to save me.” At his parents’ wishes, Coelho enrolled in law school and abandoned his dream of becoming a writer. One year later, he dropped out and lived life as a hippie, traveling through South America, North Africa, Mexico, and Europe and started using drugs in the 1960s.

Upon his return to Brazil, Coelho worked as a songwriter, composing lyrics for Elis ReginaRita Lee, and Brazilian icon Raul Seixas. Composing with Raul led to Coelho being associated with magic and occultism, due to the content of some songs. He is often accused that these songs were rip-offs of foreign songs not well known in Brazil at the time. In 1974, by his account, he was arrested for “subversive” activities and tortured by the ruling military government, who had taken power ten years earlier and viewed his lyrics as left-wing and dangerous. Coelho also worked as an actor, journalist and theatre director before pursuing his writing career.

Coelho married artist Christina Oiticica in 1980. Together they had previously spent half the year in Rio de Janeiro and the other half in a country house in the Pyrenees Mountains of France, but now the couple reside permanently in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1986 Coelho walked the 500-plus mile Road of Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. On the path, he had a spiritual awakening, which he described autobiographically in The Pilgrimage. In an interview, Coelho stated “In 1986, I was very happy in the things I was doing. I was doing something that gave me food and water – to use the metaphor in The Alchemist, I was working, I had a person whom I loved, I had money, but I was not fulfilling my dream. My dream was, and still is, to be a writer.” Coelho would leave his lucrative career as a songwriter and pursue writing full-time.

While trying to overcome his procrastination about launching his writing career, Coelho decided, “If I see a white feather today, that is a sign that God is giving me that I have to write a new book.” Seeing one in the window of a shop, he began writing that day. The following year, Coelho wrote The Alchemist and published it through a small Brazilian publishing house that made an initial print run of 900 copies and decided not to reprint it. He subsequently found a bigger publishing house, and with the publication of his next book Brida, The Alchemist took off. HarperCollins decided to publish the book in 1994. Later it became an international bestseller.

His work has been published in more than 170 countries and translated into eighty-three languages. Together, his books have sold 320 million copies. On 22 December 2016, Coelho was listed by UK-based company Richtopia at number 2 in the list of 200 most influential contemporary authors.

  • When you are enthusiastic about what you do, you feel this positive energy. It’s very simple.
  • You have to take risks. We will only understand the miracle of life fully when we allow the unexpected to happen.
  • Remember your dreams and fight for them. You must know what you want from life. There is just one thing that makes your dream become impossible: the fear of failure.
  • One is loved because one is loved. No reason is needed for loving.
  • I can control my destiny, but not my fate. Destiny means there are opportunities to turn right or left, but fate is a one-way street. I believe we all have the choice as to whether we fulfil our destiny, but our fate is sealed.
  • The good old days, when each idea had an owner, are gone forever.
  • The more in harmony with yourself you are, the more joyful you are and the more faithful you are. Faith is not to disconnect you from reality – it connects you to reality.
  • The more violent the storm, the quicker it passes.
  • I cry very easily. It can be a movie, a phone conversation, a sunset – tears are words waiting to be written.
  • People are very reluctant to talk about their private lives but then you go to the internet and they’re much more open.
  • Every blessing ignored becomes a curse.
  • The wise are wise only because they love. The fool are fools only because they think they can understand love.
  • I always was a rich person because moneys not related to happiness.
  • You’re always learning. The problem is, sometimes you stop and think you understand the world. This is not correct. The world is always moving. You never reach the point you can stop making an effort.
  • I write from my soul. This is the reason that critics don’t hurt me, because it is me. If it was not me, if I was pretending to be someone else, then this could unbalance my world, but I know who I am.
  • Things do not always happen the way I would like them to happen, and I had better get used to that.
  • What interests me in life is curiosity, challenges, the good fight with its victories and defeats.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.12.24.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.24.2021

Socrates (469 BC – 399 BC) was one of the greatest Greek philosophers. He did not propose any specific knowledge or policy. He showed how argumentdebate, and discussion could help men to understand difficult issues. Most of the issues he dealt with were only political on the surface. Underneath, they were moral questions about how life should be lived. Such is the influence of Socrates that philosophers before him are called the Presocratic philosophers. Socrates made enemies, three of whom brought charges against him. Socrates was tried for his life in 399 BC, found guilty, and put to death by drinking hemlock (a herbal poison). The story of his trial and death is the subject of a tract by Plato which is called the Apologia.

Most of what we know about Socrates comes from the works of Plato, who was his pupil. Socrates lived in the Greek city of Athens. His method of teaching was to have a dialogue with individual students. They would propose some point of view, and Socrates would question them, asking what they meant. He would pretend “I don’t know anything; I’m just trying to understand what it is you are saying”, or words to that effect. This is now called the Socratic method of teaching. Socrates is sometimes called the “father of Western philosophy“. This is because in the discussions he uncovered some of the most basic questions in philosophy, questions which are still discussed today.

  • The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.
  • By all means, marry. If you get a good wife, you’ll become happy; if you get a bad one, you’ll become a philosopher.
  • Worthless people live only to eat and drink; people of worth eat and drink only to live.
  • Wisdom begins in wonder.
  • Once made equal to man, woman becomes his superior.
  • The greatest way to live with honor in this world is to be what we pretend to be.
  • He is a man of courage who does not run away, but remains at his post and fights against the enemy.
  • I was really too honest a man to be a politician and live.
  • Ordinary people seem not to realize that those who really apply themselves in the right way to philosophy are directly and of their own accord preparing themselves for dying and death.
  • I decided that it was not wisdom that enabled poets to write their poetry, but a kind of instinct or inspiration, such as you find in seers and prophets who deliver all their sublime messages without knowing in the least what they mean.
  • Beauty is the bait which with delight allures man to enlarge his kind.
  • Ordinary people seem not to realize that those who really apply themselves in the right way to philosophy are directly and of their own accord preparing themselves for dying and death.

The Time is Now

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Friday Filosophy v.12.17.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.17.2021

John Robert Wooden (October 14, 1910 – June 4, 2010 was an American basketball player and coach. Nicknamed the “Wizard of Westwood”, he won ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period—seven in a row. Wooden was named a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player (inducted in 1961) and as a coach (in 1973), the first person ever to be in both categories. He was a Democrat. Our Friday Filosophy v.12.17.2021 brings you words of wisdom from Coach John Wooden.

Wooden was born on October 14, 1910 in HallIndiana. He studied at Purdue University. Wooden was married to Nellie Riley from 1932 until her death in 1985. They had two children. Wooden died on June 4, 2010 in Los AngelesCalifornia from natural causes, aged 99.

  • Success is peace of mind which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you did your best to become the best you are capable of becoming,
  • It’s the little details that are vital. Little things make the big things happen.
  • If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?
  • Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are.
  • Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful.
  • Do not let what you cannot do interfere with what you can do.
  • Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out.
  • Be true to yourself, help others, make each day your masterpiece, make friendship a fine art, drink deeply from good books – especially the Bible, build a shelter against a rainy day, give thanks for your blessings and pray for guidance every day.
  • Don’t let making a living prevent you from making a life.
  • You can’t live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you.
  • You can’t let praise or criticism get to you. It’s a weakness to get caught up in either one.
  • Don’t give up on your dreams, or your dreams will give up on you.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.12.10.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.10.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.10.2021 focuses upon Peter Ferdinand Drucker; German: November 19, 1909 – November 11, 2005) was an Austrian-American management consultant, educator, and author, whose writings contributed to the philosophical and practical foundations of the modern business corporation. He was also a leader in the development of management education, he invented the concept known as management by objectives and self-control, and he has been described as “the founder of modern management”.

Drucker’s books and articles, both scholarly and popular, explored how humans are organized across the business, government, and nonprofit sectors of society. He is one of the best-known and most widely influential thinkers and writers on the subject of management theory and practice. His writings have predicted many of the major developments of the late twentieth century, including privatization and decentralization; the rise of Japan to economic world power; the decisive importance of marketing; and the emergence of the information society with its necessity of lifelong learning. In 1959, Drucker coined the term “knowledge worker“, and later in his life considered knowledge-worker productivity to be the next frontier of management.

  • The best way to predict the future is to create it.
  • Efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing the right things.
  • There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which should not be done at all.
  • The entrepreneur always searches for change, responds to it, and exploits it as an opportunity.
  • We now accept the fact that learning is a lifelong process of keeping abreast of change. And the most pressing task is to teach people how to learn.
  • The most important thing in communication is hearing what isn’t said.
  • The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well the product or service fits him and sells itself.
  • Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results not attributes.
  • Most of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get their work done.
  • Knowledge has to be improved, challenged, and increased constantly, or it vanishes.

The Time is Now

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Friday Filosophy v.12.03.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.03.2021

Henry David Thoreau. July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American naturalist, essayistpoet, and philosopher. Thoreau’s books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry amount to more than 20 volumes. Among his lasting contributions are his writings on natural history and philosophy, in which he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism.

Thoreau was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the fugitive slave law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau’s philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo TolstoyMahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Thoreau is sometimes referred to as an anarchist. In “Civil Disobedience”, Thoreau wrote: “I heartily accept the motto,—’That government is best which governs least;’ and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe, ‘That government is best which governs not at all;’ and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. … I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.”

  • Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth.
  • It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.
  • Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after.
  • The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.
  • Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.
  • If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves.
  • Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.
  • Make the most of your regrets; never smother your sorrow, but tend and cherish it till it comes to have a separate and integral interest. To regret deeply is to live afresh.
  • Things do not change; we change.

The Time is Now

 

 

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Friday Filosophy v.11.26.2021

Friday Filosophy v.11.26.2021

Ludwig Philipp Albert Schweitzer; 14 January 1875 – 4 September 1965) was an Alsatian polymath. He was a theologian, organist, musicologist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. A Lutheran, Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by the historical-critical method current at this time, as well as the traditional Christian view. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life“, becoming the eighth Frenchman to be awarded that prize. His philosophy was expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, which up to 1958 was situated in French Equatorial Africa, and after this in Gabon. Our Friday Filosophy v.11.26.2021 shares thoughts and ideas from this extraordinary man.

I was influenced by Dr. Schweitzer in my teens when I read his book titled “My Childhood and Youth.” He devoted his life to the well-being of the people in Africa. A wonderful example for anyone and everyone.    

  • Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.
  • An optimist is a person who sees a green light everywhere, while a pessimist sees only the red stoplight… the truly wise person is colorblind.
  • Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight.
  • In everyone’s life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit.
  • I don’t know what your destiny will be, but one thing I know: the only ones among you who will be really happy are those who will have sought and found how to serve.
  • Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.
  • Ethics is the activity of man directed to secure the inner perfection of his own personality.
  • Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory.
  • The true worth of a man is not to be found in man himself, but in the colors and textures that come alive in others.
  • A man can do only what he can do. But if he does that each day he can sleep at night and do it again the next day.
  • Man is a clever animal who behaves like an imbecile. 
  • Everything deep is also simple and can be reproduced simply as long as its reference to the whole truth is maintained. But what matters is not what is witty but what is true. 
  • Wherever a man turns he can find someone who needs him. 
  • Seek always to do some good, somewhere. Every man has to seek in his own way to realize his true worth. You must give some time to your fellow man. For remember, you don’t live in a world all your own. Your brothers are here too. 
  • The willow which bends to the tempest, often escapes better than the oak which resists it; and so in great calamities, it sometimes happens that light and frivolous spirits recover their elasticity and presence of mind sooner than those of a loftier character.
  • Success is not the key to happiness. 
  • The African is my brother but he is my younger brother by several centuries. 
  • My life is my argument.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.11.19.2021

Friday Filosophy v.11.19.2021

Steven Alexander Wright (born December 6, 1955) is an American stand-up comedian, actor, writer, and film producer. He is known for his distinctly lethargic voice and slow, deadpan delivery of ironicphilosophical and sometimes nonsensical jokesparaprosdokiansnon sequitursanti-humor, and one-liners with contrived situations. Wright was ranked as the 15th Greatest Comedian by Rolling Stone in its 2017 list of the 50 Greatest Stand-up Comics.[2] His accolades include the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film and two Primetime Emmy Awards nominations as a producer. In this, our Friday Filosophy v.11.19.2021, we share some thoughts from Steven Wright.

  • Whenever I think of the past, it brings back so many memories.
  • What’s another word for Thesaurus? 
  • I intend to live forever. So far, so good.
  • I went to a restaurant that serves ‘breakfast at any time’. So, I ordered French Toast during the Renaissance.
  • Experience is something you don’t get until just after you need it.
  • A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory.
  • You can’t have everything. Where would you put it?
  • I have the world’s largest collection of seashells. I keep it on all the beaches of the world… perhaps you’ve seen it.
  • Someone asked me, if I were stranded on a desert island what book would I bring… ‘How to Build a Boat.’
  • Right now, I’m having amnesia and deja vu at the same time… I think I’ve forgotten this before.
  • I went down the street to the 24-hour grocery. When I got there, the guy was locking the front door. I said, ‘Hey, the sign says you’re open 24 hours.’ He said, ‘Yes, but not in a row.’
  • I used to work in a fire hydrant factory. You couldn’t park anywhere near the place.
  • For my birthday I got a humidifier and a de-humidifier… I put them in the same room and let them fight it out.
  • My doctor told me I shouldn’t work out until I’m in better shape. I told him, ‘All right; don’t send me a bill until I pay you.’
  • I’m going to get an MRI to find out whether I have claustrophobia.

 

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