Friday Filosophy v.01.07.2022

Friday Filosophy v.01.07.2022

Alexander Graham Bell was born in EdinburghScotland. His family was known for teaching people how to speak English clearly (elocution). Both his grandfather, Alexander Bell, and his father, Alexander Melville Bell, taught elocution. His father wrote often about this and is most known for his invention and writings of Visible Speech.[1] In his writings he explained ways of teaching people who were deaf and unable to speak. It also showed how these people could learn to speak words by watching their lips and reading what other people were saying.

Alexander Graham Bell went to the Royal High School of Edinburgh. He graduated at the age of fifteen. At the age of sixteen, he got a job as a student and teacher of elocution and music in Weston House Academy, at Elgin in Morayshire. He spent the next year at the University of Edinburgh. While still in Scotland, he became more interested in the science of sound (acoustics). He hoped to help his deaf mother. From 1866 to 1867, he was a teacher at Somersetshire College in Bath, Somerset.

In 1870 when he was 23 years old, he moved with his family to Canada where they settled at Brantford, Ontario. Bell began to study communication machines. He made a piano that could be heard far away by using electricity. In 1871 he went with his father to Montreal, Quebec in Canada, where he took a job teaching about “visible speech“. His father was asked to teach about it at a large school for deaf mutes in Boston, Massachusetts, but instead he gave the job to his son. The younger Bell began teaching there in 1872. Alexander Graham Bell soon became famous in the United States for this important work. He published many writings about it in Washington, D.C.. Because of this work, thousands of deaf mutes in the United States of America are now able to speak, even though they cannot hear.

Bell’s genius is seen in part by the eighteen patents granted in his name alone and the twelve that he shared with others. These included fifteen for the telephone and telegraph, four for the photophone, one for the phonograph, five for aeronautics, four for hydrofoils, and two for a selenium cell.

In 1888, he was one of the original members of the National Geographic Society and became its second president.

He was given many honors.

Some of his thoughts and words were very powerful:

  • Before anything else, preparation is the key to success.
  • Concentrate all your thoughts upon the work at hand. The sun’s rays do not burn until brought to a focus.
  • Educate the masses, elevate their standard of intelligence, and you will certainly have a successful nation.
  • When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.
  • Great discoveries and improvements invariably involve the cooperation of many minds. I may be given credit for having blazed the trail, but when I look at the subsequent developments, I feel the credit is due to others rather than to myself.
  • America is a country of inventors, and the greatest of inventors are the newspaper men.
  • A man, as a general rule, owes very little to what he is born with – a man is what he makes of himself.
  • A man’s own judgment should be the final appeal in all that relates to himself.
  • My knowledge of electrical subjects was not acquired in a methodical manner but was picked up from such books as I could get hold of and from such experiments as I could make with my own hands.
  • I would impress upon your minds the fact that if you want to do a man justice, you should believe what a man says himself rather than what people say he says.
  • Such a chimerical idea as telegraphing vocal sounds would indeed, to most minds, seem scarcely feasible enough to spend time in working over. I believe, however, that it is feasible and that I have got the cue to the solution of the problem.
  • Morse conquered his electrical difficulties although he was only a painter, and I don’t intend to give in either till all is completed.
  • I do not recognize the right of the public to break in the front door of a man’s private life in order to satisfy the gaze of the curious… I do not think it right to dissect living men even for the advancement of science. So far as I am concerned, I prefer a postmortem examination to vivisection without anesthetics.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.12.31.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.31.2021

Paulo Coelho de Souza; was born in Rio de JaneiroBrazil, and attended a Jesuit school. At 17, Coelho’s parents committed him to a mental institution from which he escaped three times before being released at the age of 20. Coelho later remarked that “It wasn’t that they wanted to hurt me, but they didn’t know what to do… They did not do that to destroy me, they did that to save me.” At his parents’ wishes, Coelho enrolled in law school and abandoned his dream of becoming a writer. One year later, he dropped out and lived life as a hippie, traveling through South America, North Africa, Mexico, and Europe and started using drugs in the 1960s.

Upon his return to Brazil, Coelho worked as a songwriter, composing lyrics for Elis ReginaRita Lee, and Brazilian icon Raul Seixas. Composing with Raul led to Coelho being associated with magic and occultism, due to the content of some songs. He is often accused that these songs were rip-offs of foreign songs not well known in Brazil at the time. In 1974, by his account, he was arrested for “subversive” activities and tortured by the ruling military government, who had taken power ten years earlier and viewed his lyrics as left-wing and dangerous. Coelho also worked as an actor, journalist and theatre director before pursuing his writing career.

Coelho married artist Christina Oiticica in 1980. Together they had previously spent half the year in Rio de Janeiro and the other half in a country house in the Pyrenees Mountains of France, but now the couple reside permanently in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1986 Coelho walked the 500-plus mile Road of Santiago de Compostela in northwestern Spain. On the path, he had a spiritual awakening, which he described autobiographically in The Pilgrimage. In an interview, Coelho stated “In 1986, I was very happy in the things I was doing. I was doing something that gave me food and water – to use the metaphor in The Alchemist, I was working, I had a person whom I loved, I had money, but I was not fulfilling my dream. My dream was, and still is, to be a writer.” Coelho would leave his lucrative career as a songwriter and pursue writing full-time.

While trying to overcome his procrastination about launching his writing career, Coelho decided, “If I see a white feather today, that is a sign that God is giving me that I have to write a new book.” Seeing one in the window of a shop, he began writing that day. The following year, Coelho wrote The Alchemist and published it through a small Brazilian publishing house that made an initial print run of 900 copies and decided not to reprint it. He subsequently found a bigger publishing house, and with the publication of his next book Brida, The Alchemist took off. HarperCollins decided to publish the book in 1994. Later it became an international bestseller.

His work has been published in more than 170 countries and translated into eighty-three languages. Together, his books have sold 320 million copies. On 22 December 2016, Coelho was listed by UK-based company Richtopia at number 2 in the list of 200 most influential contemporary authors.

  • When you are enthusiastic about what you do, you feel this positive energy. It’s very simple.
  • You have to take risks. We will only understand the miracle of life fully when we allow the unexpected to happen.
  • Remember your dreams and fight for them. You must know what you want from life. There is just one thing that makes your dream become impossible: the fear of failure.
  • One is loved because one is loved. No reason is needed for loving.
  • I can control my destiny, but not my fate. Destiny means there are opportunities to turn right or left, but fate is a one-way street. I believe we all have the choice as to whether we fulfil our destiny, but our fate is sealed.
  • The good old days, when each idea had an owner, are gone forever.
  • The more in harmony with yourself you are, the more joyful you are and the more faithful you are. Faith is not to disconnect you from reality – it connects you to reality.
  • The more violent the storm, the quicker it passes.
  • I cry very easily. It can be a movie, a phone conversation, a sunset – tears are words waiting to be written.
  • People are very reluctant to talk about their private lives but then you go to the internet and they’re much more open.
  • Every blessing ignored becomes a curse.
  • The wise are wise only because they love. The fool are fools only because they think they can understand love.
  • I always was a rich person because moneys not related to happiness.
  • You’re always learning. The problem is, sometimes you stop and think you understand the world. This is not correct. The world is always moving. You never reach the point you can stop making an effort.
  • I write from my soul. This is the reason that critics don’t hurt me, because it is me. If it was not me, if I was pretending to be someone else, then this could unbalance my world, but I know who I am.
  • Things do not always happen the way I would like them to happen, and I had better get used to that.
  • What interests me in life is curiosity, challenges, the good fight with its victories and defeats.

The Time is Now.

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What’s Next?

What’s Next?

As 2021 winds down it is time for some reflection and some contemplation. What have we been able to get done in 2021 and what is next for us in 2022?

There has been a lot of confusion this year, wouldn’t you say? Politically, economically, and socially. Perhaps many of us ourselves have been confused. At Learning Without Scars we have been very busy.

  1. We received our IACET Approved provider accreditation.
  2. We revamped our website.
  3. We expanded on the Resources available to our followers.
  4. We introduced Podcasts to our audience.
  5. We added more Contributors to our blogs and podcasts.
  6. We created a Quarterly Newsletter.
  7. We created Audio Learning in multiple languages.
  8. We rounded out our Subject Specific Classes at 108 subjects available.
  9. We rounded out our Job Function Assessments at 18 available.
  10. We made available all of our Job Function Assessments in French and Spanish.
  11. We made our Parts Subject Specific Classes in French.
  12. We create Partnerships with Service Providers, Associations and Consulting Groups.

Now that is a Dozen Items to contend with and it is a list that we take a lot of pride in sharing with you. Ross Atkinson has been a large part of this work and we are most appreciative of having him participating with us in our business. I would like to extend our most sincere thanks to Norma Robbins and Louise Duranleau for their work in providing us the translations and audio tracks for the job function assessments and subject specific classes. And finally, to Caroline Slee-Poulos for her untiring work on working with IACET and completing our accreditation after nearly three years of work. My thanks to all of you.

Yet there are miles to go before we rest.

  1. In 2022 we expect to complete all classes in Spanish, French and English.
  2. We are modifying all subject specific classes to provide multiple quizzes in each class. These quizzes are aimed at improving learning and knowledge retention.
  3. We are working with Industry Associations to provide their members access to all of our learning products.
  4. We are working with Equipment Manufacturers to provide training to their dealership field personnel
  5. We are working with Systems Suppliers to provide training to their sales teams and support personnel.
  6. We will start working with Technical and Vocational Schools to introduce our subject specific classes into their curriculum for mechanical and technical training.
  7. We will be introducing new Products in the Learning area; – new Subject Specific Classes and more Job Function Assessments
  8. We will be adding new Zoom Offerings with panels of subject matter experts providing discussion on specific subjects and specific books that we are discussing.
  9. We will be looking to creating an industry wide Job Certification Program.
  10. We will accelerate our marketing activities with email blasts, e-books and snail mail programs.
  11. We will continue to improve the depth and breadth of our reporting to assist our clients in keeping track of the progress of their employees who are enrolled in LWS products.
  12. We will closely monitor our compliance with IACET requirements and keep them current with our activities.

While we are getting all of that done, we also intend to have thousands of individuals take Job Function Assessments and enroll in Subject Specific Classes.

We would not be in the position we are now, of being the supplier of the most comprehensive list of training products and employee development programs in the industry, were it not for the invaluable assistance we have received from you, our clients. Your suggestions and questions are all taken seriously and without your input and involvement we would never have gotten this far down the road. From our start with Quest Learning Centers in 1994, which provided Classroom Programs and Webinars, to Learning Without Scars, which is focused on Internet Based Learning we have depended heavily on your support.

Our purpose as a business is very simple.

We provide complementary resources to assist each individual to find their potential with blogs, podcasts, audio learning, suggested reading lists, newsletters and job function assessments. Then we give each person a pathway to achieving their potential through the use of Skill Level Pathways. To the thousands of you who have taken assessments and classes with us we say thank you. We know you are making a difference in your lives both personally and professionally through your commitment to excellence. We wish you all the success that you are dreaming about in your life. Your individual happiness is a true sign of a successful life. Thank you as well.

I want to close this blog, our last for the year, with a quotation from our Mascot, “Socrates.”

Socrates Says – Employ your time in improving yourself by other men’s writings, so that you shall gain easily what others have labored hard for.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.12.03.2021

Friday Filosophy v.12.03.2021

Henry David Thoreau. July 12, 1817 – May 6, 1862) was an American naturalist, essayistpoet, and philosopher. Thoreau’s books, articles, essays, journals, and poetry amount to more than 20 volumes. Among his lasting contributions are his writings on natural history and philosophy, in which he anticipated the methods and findings of ecology and environmental history, two sources of modern-day environmentalism.

Thoreau was a lifelong abolitionist, delivering lectures that attacked the fugitive slave law while praising the writings of Wendell Phillips and defending the abolitionist John Brown. Thoreau’s philosophy of civil disobedience later influenced the political thoughts and actions of such notable figures as Leo TolstoyMahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King Jr.

Thoreau is sometimes referred to as an anarchist. In “Civil Disobedience”, Thoreau wrote: “I heartily accept the motto,—’That government is best which governs least;’ and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe, ‘That government is best which governs not at all;’ and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. … I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government.”

  • Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth.
  • It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.
  • Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after.
  • The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.
  • Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves.
  • If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
  • Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves.
  • Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.
  • Make the most of your regrets; never smother your sorrow, but tend and cherish it till it comes to have a separate and integral interest. To regret deeply is to live afresh.
  • Things do not change; we change.

The Time is Now

 

 

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Friday Filosophy v.11.26.2021

Friday Filosophy v.11.26.2021

Ludwig Philipp Albert Schweitzer; 14 January 1875 – 4 September 1965) was an Alsatian polymath. He was a theologian, organist, musicologist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. A Lutheran, Schweitzer challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by the historical-critical method current at this time, as well as the traditional Christian view. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of “Reverence for Life“, becoming the eighth Frenchman to be awarded that prize. His philosophy was expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, which up to 1958 was situated in French Equatorial Africa, and after this in Gabon. Our Friday Filosophy v.11.26.2021 shares thoughts and ideas from this extraordinary man.

I was influenced by Dr. Schweitzer in my teens when I read his book titled “My Childhood and Youth.” He devoted his life to the well-being of the people in Africa. A wonderful example for anyone and everyone.    

  • Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.
  • An optimist is a person who sees a green light everywhere, while a pessimist sees only the red stoplight… the truly wise person is colorblind.
  • Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight.
  • In everyone’s life, at some time, our inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner spirit.
  • I don’t know what your destiny will be, but one thing I know: the only ones among you who will be really happy are those who will have sought and found how to serve.
  • Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.
  • Ethics is the activity of man directed to secure the inner perfection of his own personality.
  • Happiness is nothing more than good health and a bad memory.
  • The true worth of a man is not to be found in man himself, but in the colors and textures that come alive in others.
  • A man can do only what he can do. But if he does that each day he can sleep at night and do it again the next day.
  • Man is a clever animal who behaves like an imbecile. 
  • Everything deep is also simple and can be reproduced simply as long as its reference to the whole truth is maintained. But what matters is not what is witty but what is true. 
  • Wherever a man turns he can find someone who needs him. 
  • Seek always to do some good, somewhere. Every man has to seek in his own way to realize his true worth. You must give some time to your fellow man. For remember, you don’t live in a world all your own. Your brothers are here too. 
  • The willow which bends to the tempest, often escapes better than the oak which resists it; and so in great calamities, it sometimes happens that light and frivolous spirits recover their elasticity and presence of mind sooner than those of a loftier character.
  • Success is not the key to happiness. 
  • The African is my brother but he is my younger brother by several centuries. 
  • My life is my argument.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.11.12.2021

FRIDAY FILOSOPHY v.11.12.2021

Vincent Willem van Gogh March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who posthumously became one of the most famous and influential figures in Western art history. In a decade, he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of which date from the last two years of his life. They include landscapesstill life’sportraits and self-portraits, and are characterized by bold colors and dramatic, impulsive and expressive brushwork that contributed to the foundations of modern art. Not commercially successful, he struggled with severe depression and poverty, eventually leading to his suicide at age thirty-seven.

  • Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.
  • Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.
  • Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship.
  • The mind is everything. What you think you become.
  • No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.
  • To keep the body in good health is a duty… otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.
  • It is better to travel well than to arrive.
  • You will not be punished for your anger; you will be punished by your anger.
  • There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting.
  • Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without.
  • To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one’s family, to bring peace to all, one must first discipline and control one’s own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him.
  • Whatever words we utter should be chosen with care for people will hear them and be influenced by them for good or ill.
  • It is a man’s own mind, not his enemy or foe, that lures him to evil ways.
  • Just as a candle cannot burn without fire, men cannot live without a spiritual life.
  • However, many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them?
  • To be idle is a short road to death and to be diligent is a way of life; foolish people are idle, wise people are diligent.
  • In a controversy the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.
  • I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.11.05.2021

FRIDAY FILOSOPHY v.11.05.2021

Gautama Buddha, popularly known as the Buddha was a Sramana who lived in ancient India (c. 5th to 4th century BCE). He is regarded as the founder of the world religion of Buddhism, and revered by most Buddhist schools as a savior, the Enlightened One who rediscovered an ancient path to release clinging and craving and escape the cycle of birth and rebirth. He taught for around 45 years and built a large following, both monastic and lay. The Buddha was born into an aristocratic family in the Shakya clan but eventually renounced lay life. According to Buddhist tradition, after several years of mendicancy, meditation, and asceticism, he awakened to understand the mechanism which keeps people trapped in the cycle of rebirth. A couple of centuries after his death he came to be known by the title Buddha, which means “Awakened One” or “Enlightened One”. Gautama’s teachings were compiled by the Buddhist community in the Vinaya, his codes for monastic practice, and the Suttas, texts based on his discourses. These were passed down in Middle-Indo Aryan dialects through an oral tradition.

  • Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.
  • Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.
  • Health is the greatest gift, contentment the greatest wealth, faithfulness the best relationship.
  • The mind is everything. What you think you become.
  • No one saves us but ourselves. No one can and no one may. We ourselves must walk the path.
  • To keep the body in good health is a duty… otherwise we shall not be able to keep our mind strong and clear.
  • It is better to travel well than to arrive.
  • You will not be punished for your anger; you will be punished by your anger.
  • There are only two mistakes one can make along the road to truth; not going all the way, and not starting.
  • Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without.
  • To enjoy good health, to bring true happiness to one’s family, to bring peace to all, one must first discipline and control one’s own mind. If a man can control his mind he can find the way to Enlightenment, and all wisdom and virtue will naturally come to him.
  • Whatever words we utter should be chosen with care for people will hear them and be influenced by them for good or ill.
  • It is a man’s own mind, not his enemy or foe, that lures him to evil ways.
  • Just as a candle cannot burn without fire, men cannot live without a spiritual life.
  • However, many holy words you read, however many you speak, what good will they do you if you do not act on upon them?
  • To be idle is a short road to death and to be diligent is a way of life; foolish people are idle, wise people are diligent.
  • In a controversy the instant we feel anger we have already ceased striving for the truth, and have begun striving for ourselves.
  • I do not believe in a fate that falls on men however they act; but I do believe in a fate that falls on them unless they act.

The time is now.

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Friday Filosophy v.10.29.2021

FRIDAY FILOSOPHY v.10.29.2021

Many of you will have noticed we have been writing Blogs and recording Podcasts that are trying to provoke businesses to embrace continuous improvement and make changes. Most recently as a result of a Podcast with Mets Kramer. We were talking about how Amazon and Google conduct their businesses. How within Amazon they were constantly reviewing customer needs and wants and making adjustments. They were working on their businesses not just in their business. Mets and I talked about the fact that within our Industry we were problem solvers. That isn’t a bad thing. We were working hard in the business trying to satisfy customer needs and wants. We didn’t find many dealerships that were working on their business. Trying to change their systems and processes. That simply won’t be sufficient. Time is running out on continuing to do what you have always done.

  • The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance. Alan Watts
  • They always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself. Andy Warhol
  • Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it, without knowing what’s going to happen next. Gilda Radner
  • You must be the change you wish to see in the world. Mahatma Gandhi
  • If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude. Maya Angelou
  • He who rejects change is the architect of decay. The only human institution which rejects progress is the cemetery. Harold Wilson
  • There is nothing permanent except change. Heraclitus
  • The world is changing very fast. Big will not beat small anymore. It will be the fast beating the slow. Rupert Murdoch
  • I have noticed even people who claim everything is predestined, and that we can do nothing to change it, look before they cross the road. Stephen Hawking
  • The thing that lies at the foundation of positive change, the way I see it, is service to a fellow human being. Lech Walesa
  • Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future. John F. Kennedy
  • Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator. And change has its enemies. Robert Kennedy
  • You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself. That is something you have charge of. Jim Rohn
  • Life belongs to the living, and he who lives must be prepared for changes. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for it to learn to fly while remaining an egg. We are like eggs at present. And you cannot go on indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg. We must be hatched or go bad. S. Lewis
  • Change the changeable, accept the unchangeable, and remove yourself from the unacceptable. Denis Waitley
  • There are two kinds of fools: those who can’t change their opinions and those who won’t. Josh Billings
  • In times of rapid change, experience could be your worst enemy. Paul Getty
  • It is change, continuing change, inevitable change, that is the dominant factor in society today. No sensible decision can be made any longer without taking into account not only the world as it is, but the world as it will be. Isaac Asimov
  • I’m a catalyst for change. You can’t be an outsider and be successful over 30 years without leaving a certain amount of scar tissue around the place. Rupert Murdoch

The Time is Now

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Friday Filosophy v.10.22.2021

Friday Filosophy v.10.22.2021

Aesop  620–564 BCE was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop’s Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics.

Scattered details of Aesop’s life can be found in ancient sources, including AristotleHerodotus, and Plutarch. An ancient literary work called The Aesop Romance tells an episodic, probably highly fictional version of his life, including the traditional description of him as a strikingly ugly slave who by his cleverness acquires freedom and becomes an adviser to kings and city-states.

  • No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.
  • We hang the petty thieves and appoint the great ones to public office.
  • A liar will not be believed, even when he speaks the truth.
  • Every truth has two sides; it is as well to look at both, before we commit ourselves to either.
  • After all is said and done, more is said than done.
  • It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds
  • The level of our success is limited only by our imagination and no act of kindness, however small, is ever wasted.
  • We often give our enemies the means for our own destruction.
  • The smaller the mind the greater the conceit.
  • Any excuse will serve a tyrant.
  • Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction
  • He that is discontented in one place will seldom be happy in another.
  • He that always gives way to others will end in having no principles of his own.
  • The unhappy derive comfort from the misfortunes of others.
  • Better be wise by the misfortunes of others than by your own.

The Time is Now.

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Friday Filosophy v.10.08.2021

FRIDAY FILOSOPHY v.10.08.2021

We have been focused on individuals in our Friday Filosophy. I am shifting this week to deal with personal issues, our lives. Over time there have been wonderful individuals who have made powerful statements regarding life. Perhaps some reflection on these people and these quotations is warranted. Enjoy

 

  • Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less. Marie Curie
  • We do not remember days, we remember moments. Cesare Pavese
  • The truth is you don’t know what is going to happen tomorrow. Life is a crazy ride, and nothing is guaranteed. Eminem
  • Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment. Buddha
  • Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans. John Lennon
  • He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Life is a dream for the wise, a game for the fool, a comedy for the rich, a tragedy for the poor. Sholom Aleichem
  • Life is a song – sing it. Life is a game – play it. Life is a challenge – meet it. Life is a dream – realize it. Life is a sacrifice – offer it. Life is love – enjoy it. Sai Baba
  • Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life; define yourself. Harvey Fierstein
  • Open your eyes, look within. Are you satisfied with the life you’re living? Bob Marley
  • Every man dies. Not every man really lives. William Wallace
  • Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself. George Bernard Shaw
  • When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, ‘I used everything you gave me’. Erma Bombeck
  • A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives. Jackie Robinson
  • The only disability in life is a bad attitude. Scott Hamilton
  • Growth is the only evidence of life. John Henry Newman
  • Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can’t help them, at least don’t hurt them. Dalai Lama

The Time is Now.

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